12.5.17 Science Speed Dating

Some of the most productive scientific collaborations arise when people from wildly different backgrounds meet by chance and bring new, fresh approaches that resist traditional techniques. Making people from different backgrounds mix, however, is a challenging task, which is typically just left to serendipity. We describe an approach jointly developed by a Cambridge and Trento team to favour the mixing of scientists at conferences. Our approach is inspired by ‘speed dating‘ – where pairs of scientists are formed and briefly discuss their work for 5 minutes, and then exchange information. However, instead of leaving the formation of pairs to chance, we develop a framework based on network theory to create a compatibility matrix between all possible pairs of scientist based on different criteria, such as maximizing heterogeneity, or minimizing overlap between known fields, etc and then use the Maximum-Weight Perfect Matching Algorithm to find the optimal pairs. We show how to solve this using tools from the SciPy ecosystem pandas, networkx, numpy, matplotlib and describe an open source implementation of our algorithm.

Science Speed-Dating Aims To Boost Accuracy In TV And Film

Listen to five quick-fire talks by experts whose work spans a range of scientific fields. Hear about research taking place on the cutting edge of science, peer into the possibilities of our technological future, and leave inspired by a STEMM smorgasbord of ideas! Moon has worked on issues in the history, philosophy, and cultural studies of math and science.

Recently, at least two independent teams of social scientists have recognized the immense power of speed-dating procedures to address diverse scientific.

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Register now and meet your future business partners. The Speed Dating takes place on all three days of E-world and is organized in cooperation with Innoloft. We use cookies to optimize the information on this website for you and to personalize content. In order to further improve the performance of the website, we process anonymous visitor data. Together with our partners, we use technologies that enable us to present offers tailored to your needs.

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Speed Dating with Scientists

Today, finding a date is not a challenge — finding a match is probably the issue. In —, Columbia University ran a speed-dating experiment where they tracked 21 speed dating sessions for mostly young adults meeting people of the opposite sex. I was interested in finding out what it was about someone during that short interaction that determined whether or not someone viewed them as a match.

The dataset at the link above is quite substantial — over 8, observations with almost datapoints for each. However, I was only interested in the speed dates themselves, and so I simplified the data and uploaded a smaller version of the dataset to my Github account here.

The appeal of speed dating protocols to social scientists is that speed dating can be conducted with high levels of external validity despite a.

At the Computational and Systems Neuroscience Cosyne conference in Utah in February, 15 experimentalists and 15 theorists and data analysts pitched their talents in a speed-dating-style event. Each pair chatted for three minutes to figure out if they had potential for a scientific spark and then moved on to the next candidate. At the end of the event, participants chose three people they wanted to collaborate with.

If the feeling is mutual, they will be matched with their selections. They were brainstorming ways to encourage shy scientists to connect, ideally in a structured format where people would give short elevator pitches about their work to many different individuals. Giovannucci originally proposed the speed-dating concept in jest, but the idea quickly caught on. Within 24 hours, the Simons Foundation team had put together the event, hosting 13 experimentalist-theorist pairs. This year, more than 50 people registered.

Because of time constraints, only the first 15 from each group were invited to participate. Participants certainly had a lot to talk about — at the end of each round, most were reluctant to move on to the next candidate. Michael Kohl , an experimentalist at the University of Oxford, made a number of connections even before getting his post-hoc matches. He particularly liked the mix of participants — mostly senior postdocs and junior professors.

Indeed, most participants had a hard time limiting themselves to three matches.

“The difference between Oiweek and other innovation events? Efficiency and Business!”

Some theorize that online daters may be wearing rose colored glasses when looking at potential dates — filling in the information scientific with positive qualities in a potential partner Gibbs et al. In one study, knowing more information about a potential date generally led to scientific them less, possibly because it speed out inconsistencies and reduced opportunities to fill modern the blanks with positive inferences.

But, with a particularly compatible partner, more information led to more liking.

Public-scientifique «Speed-dating» est de retour en Biology ’18 Pour plus d’​infos veuillez visiter ce lien: “Scientists, do outreach, or your science dies”; Il est.

A group of neuroscientists has organised a virtual conference incorporating an ‘online dating‘ system. With academic conferences cancelled worldwide due to the Covid pandemic, the international research community is finding alternative ways of getting together to present their work, exchange ideas, and make new connections with like-minded people in their area.

This week, Dr Dan Goodman and colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania will be hosting neuromatch — a free, web-based “unconference” for neuroscientists. As well as online presentations from invited speakers, the event includes a computer-assisted online-networking element, adapted from the mind-matching sessions that are a recent feature of the Cognitive Computational Neuroscience CCN conference. A really important part is meeting new people and starting new collaborations.

The mind-matching system uses abstracts of submitted research papers, and applies machine learning algorithms, to automatically match participants for a series of minute one-to-one chats — which Dan describes as a bit like academic speed-dating. This lets it suggest new meetings between people who do not already know each other, but really should, based on their research interest.

Mixing scientists at conferences using speed dating

Outfitted in a large, white hazmat suit, Merchant briefed the crowd on the history of the National Academy of Sciences, a private nonprofit made possible by Abraham Lincoln, a fan of good science policy. Then, finally, a reveal. First to arrive was Summer Ash, an astrophysicist and rocket scientist with a slew of credits and a love of black holes. Munish Walther-Puri was next. He told us to picture everything that we hold dear; our most prized information. And that data is already being compromised.

We got science-curious people to “speed-date” with scientists. The quotation marks indicate that our type of speed-dating was bound to be.

To support our nonprofit science journalism, please make a tax-deductible gift today. F inding new research partners can be a challenge for basic scientists and clinical researchers, as it may require them to step outside of their daily commitments. But it’s important: Meeting scientists from other disciplines can spark a new research idea or open the door to a solution to a problem that has seemed intractable. It wasn’t a Gordon Conference. It was just, ‘Let’s see if we can make a connection and then take it further if we need to.

This process continues until everyone in one group has met everyone in the other group. The goal, for translational research as for dating, is to find a match. More than 80 people registered for the event, and follow-ups with the attendees suggest it worked as planned: Eighty-five percent of participants said they met at least one potential collaborator, and seven pairs of researchers applied for internal pilot funding.

Word has gotten out: Other institutions and organizations have contacted us hoping to learn how to run their own events. This article is intended to provide suggestions for putting together your own speed-networking event, using ours as an example.

What Matters in Speed Dating?

Barbara J. Have you ever walked out of a movie theater and said to your companion, “Wow, the science in that film was awesome? You might think, here, of Jodie Foster searching for extraterrestrial intelligence in the now-classic movie Contact. Or, more recently, Matt Damon sciencing his way out of trouble when stranded in The Martian , or the smart linguist-and-theoretical physicist team played by Amy Adams and Jeremy Renner working to communicate with heptapods in Arrival.

Request PDF | From romance to rocket science: Speed dating in higher education | This article is the first comprehensive review of speed dating in the tertiary.

I had the pleasure of attending the San Diego Comic-Con. I was invited to moderate a NASA panel on exoplanets, with the twist of looking at them through the lens of science fiction. How do the planets we discovery compare to those seen in Star Trek , Stargate , and so on? So no graphics, nothing but their own voice and enthusiasm. That sounded like a lot of fun, and I love the Exchange, so I agreed immediately. It turned out to be a good choice. I had a blast. The event was live-streamed by Skybound Entertainment , and the folks involved were me, my pal and fellow astronomer Clifford V.

Mays , and economist Alison Sanchez , agricultural researcher Bobby Williams , with the whole thing moderated by Eric Heisserer , who wrote the screenplay for the wonderful movie Arrival. It was a lot of fun!

Modern Love: Scientific Insights from 21st Century Dating

After a grueling arms race exposed to the never ending onslaught of invaders, our immune system has developed techniques to ensure clearance of infected cells. These adaptive immune cells use certain “markers” to identify health cells from intruders. I will be discussing the “yin and yang” effects of immune cells killing infected cells by varying concentrations of these “markers”.

Millions of 23andMe customers have consented to participate in research and contributed more than a billion datapoints, making our cohort the largest research database of genotypic information in the world.

We asked our Scientists to ditch the powerpoint for this one and share the love of science in a fun and unique format — Speed Dating with Scientists! 5 scientists.

On a cold, rainy night in December , a dedicated band of scientists and storytellers met at The William Vale in Brooklyn. The event: Science Speed Dating. While all too brief, our speakers managed to talk about problems they work with, what these seemingly obscure problems mean for the rest of us, and—perhaps most exciting for storytellers—the all important human drama behind the scenes. Speaking of human drama, The Exchange places attendees into groups by handing out numbered keys.

At this event yours truly reunited with a long-lost cousin, a SAG card—carrying actress turned software developer. But on to the event! Betul Kacar, an astrobiologist at Harvard University, researches astrobiology, or the biology of alien life forms. Unfortunately Earth is short on actual alien wildlife at the moment. So her lab looks at the next best thing—ancient bacteria from when Earth was a very different place.

She let us know what to look for to find life on planets very different from ours today.

Science Speed Dating


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